Featured Member Quilts: April 25

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Love is always stitched into quilts. Nancy Toner shared this one with our readers. It’s in a pattern we call “Aster”, a type of “Dresden Plate”, but it may have other names. Notice the hearts at the sashing corner blocks. Nancy writes,

Thisone was for my sister, who lost her home and everything she owned in the NY floods, started this last July, then in December, she suddenly lost her husband, which made me put the push on to finish it. My hands are gone, so it had to be a machine quilt, but nothing fancy, and words of love in each flower for her to hold on to. “YOU are my sister, and I love you, may all of your dreams come true. It is my first real quilt, other than a star quilt I made over about a 20 year period, using my grandma’s piecing technique. My daughter owns that now, and I have the quilt bug! I now have a crazy quilt ready for it’s backing, and am pushing on a cathedral window.”

All of us who have either been through disasters or who have done comfort quilts for those affected know how important it is. We here at 24 Blocks really were moved by Nancy’s. The words of love are literally stitched into it. Thank you, Nancy, for sharing it with our community.

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Donna Brubaker created this sampler quilt that she calls “Poppy Love”. Don’t you love the bright red and complimentaly green? Donna commented,

I fell in love with the bold poppy fabric and gathered over 25 fat quarters and fabric from my stash to complete the blocks from previous blocks of the month I have made over the years. It was machine quilted by Ruth Stonesifer, a former quilt teacher.

It’s bright and lively while being modern. And it’s clearly well done. Bravo, Donna!


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Starr DeJesus made two lap quilts for the daughters of her nephew. This is one of them. He is in the Army and being relocated to Alaska. The little girls are six and eight and their quilts will help keep them warm…and entertain them with fancy. Starr writes,

“The dinosaur quilt was taken from “Fons & Porter’s baby Quilts”, Fall 2010 issue. The girly girl quilt was from “Quiltmaker’s 100 Blocks”, Spring ’12 issue.”

Starr also says that legs on the two big dinos flap up and down.

“It was a labor of love and I was well rewarded by the girl’s reactions and their immediate attachment to their quilts.

We love, too, the dino tracks on the border! Thanks, Starr, for sharing it with our readers.

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Lesa Cozens did this variation of a Tumbling Blocks, a vintage pattern that is captivating to see. It’s one of our favorites at 24 Blocks, although we admit to not knowing the precise name of the pattern. In our family we have always called it “Tumbling Blocks in a Hex” or “Baby Blocks”. Lesa writes that it is the first quilt she has done that was not just squares and that she is saving it for a future grandchild. It has been very popular with our readers. It’s just always nice to see traditional patterns kept alive.

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Don’t you love Audrey Dwyer‘s newest strip quilt? It looks like stained glass surrounded by marble. And it would not be too hard to make. Audrey writes,

It’sbasically a Jelly Roll race quilt…I mixed this one up with some widerstrips in the second phase of the strips being sewn…then I ended up with a square of all the strips and to make it a twin size I cut some off the sides to add to the top andbottom. Super quick and fast…can get tangled when you are working with the initial long long strip but so worth it I think. I’ve played with different widths, adding vertical elements…I have plans to make aking size eventually with larger squares in it too. This jelly roll I used was a 40 strip batik rainbow of gorgeousness. And then I added a few of the wider strips. Hope that helps!”

Thank all of you so much for uploading the photos of your art to our 24 Blocks Facebook page. In social media we learn from each other. We especially like hearing stories that go with the quilt and learning about the pattern used and source and your construction details.

Happy Quilting.

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